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To a Pied Myna

23 Sep

Glamorous looks, Melodious voice,PiedMyna
You shy little Pied Myna, why do you avoid me,
I love your company, be dear to me
I want to hear you, come near to me

I know unlike your cousin the Common Myna,
You aren`t bold enough,
But your beauty surpasses the boldness,
Beautiful is a useful as the useful,
So why worry sing a song of melody

PiedMyna2You enjoy with your comrades flying left and right,
With joyful chill bill of friendship,
Your looks send vibes of joy through one’s soul,
We are addicted to technology but only in nature do we find solace

Oh sometimes indulged in lust and glamour I lose sight of you,
Politics and vain glory eat my head,
But now firmly do I resolve not to lust and no to vain politics,
Firmly till the end for eternity like you to enjoy for God`s glory

 

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The Three Kings

25 Dec

by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Three Kings came riding from far away,img_20161218_234810
Melchior and Gaspar and Baltasar;
Three Wise Men out of the East were they,
And they travelled by night and they slept by day,
For their guide was a beautiful, wonderful star.

The star was so beautiful, large and clear,
That all the other stars of the sky
Became a white mist in the atmosphere,
And by this they knew that the coming was near
Of the Prince foretold in the prophecy.

Three caskets they bore on their saddle-bows,
Three caskets of gold with golden keys;
Their robes were of crimson silk with rows
Of bells and pomegranates and furbelows,
Their turbans like blossoming almond-trees.

And so the Three Kings rode into the West,
Through the dusk of the night, over hill and dell,
And sometimes they nodded with beard on breast,
And sometimes talked, as they paused to rest,
With the people they met at some wayside well.

“Of the child that is born,” said Baltasar,
“Good people, I pray you, tell us the news;
For we in the East have seen his star,
And have ridden fast, and have ridden far,
To find and worship the King of the Jews.”

And the people answered, “You ask in vain;
We know of no King but Herod the Great!”
They thought the Wise Men were men insane,
As they spurred their horses across the plain,
Like riders in haste, who cannot wait.

And when they came to Jerusalem,
Herod the Great, who had heard this thing,
Sent for the Wise Men and questioned them;
And said, “Go down unto Bethlehem,
And bring me tidings of this new king.”

So they rode away; and the star stood still,
The only one in the grey of morn;
Yes, it stopped –it stood still of its own free will,
Right over Bethlehem on the hill,
The city of David, where Christ was born.

And the Three Kings rode through the gate and the guard,
Through the silent street, till their horses turned
And neighed as they entered the great inn-yard;
But the windows were closed, and the doors were barred,
And only a light in the stable burned.

And cradled there in the scented hay,
In the air made sweet by the breath of kine,
The little child in the manger lay,
The child, that would be king one day
Of a kingdom not human, but divine.

His mother Mary of Nazareth
Sat watching beside his place of rest,
Watching the even flow of his breath,
For the joy of life and the terror of death
Were mingled together in her breast.

They laid their offerings at his feet:
The gold was their tribute to a King,
The frankincense, with its odor sweet,
Was for the Priest, the Paraclete,
The myrrh for the body’s burying.

And the mother wondered and bowed her head,
And sat as still as a statue of stone,
Her heart was troubled yet comforted,
Remembering what the Angel had said
Of an endless reign and of David’s throne.

Then the Kings rode out of the city gate,
With a clatter of hoofs in proud array;
But they went not back to Herod the Great,
For they knew his malice and feared his hate,
And returned to their homes by another way.

To a Laborer

21 Oct

laborer
Oh Laborer of a desert city,
You toil day and night without rest,
Doing your best to build the city that never rests,
From the tallest to the smartest towers your hand exists,
But seldom people recognise that you even subsist

Short sleepless nights, to long working hours,
Weekends or weekdays are no different to you,
No worldly pleasure only dreams of a bright future,
Cold winter and hot summer are all that you enjoy,
Oh God does see your plight and shall give you rest

Some never survive to tell the tale,
Weakness, hopelessness kill their being,
Only some survive to see the face of their loved ones,
Oh what a joy to see their Papa, Husband, Son back,
Joy and Glory greater than a valiant soldier from war

With lot of dreams did they arrive at this land,
Many did realise their dreams to see their kids prosper,
Some admire this land compared to their own,
Many are desperate wanting to go back to their loved ones,
Oh Laborer, we honour you and pray for you

To a White Tiger

16 Jul

It roams around in a cage of glass,
With royal posture and grim looks,
It growls at the onlooker on green grass,
Elegantly doing the routine catwalk on hooks,
Unknowing the pleasure it gives to mankind

The White tiger with its royal acclaim,
A pleasure to eyes and solace to mind,
Oh mighty cat you know not our claim,
Children excited, adults in full wind,
To have your view because you are so few

Once you did used to rule our jungle,
Though seldom people knew your value,
Many men indifferently struggle,
Your nails to tail they devalue,
Oh if they admired your beauty, so precious

Time has passed and technology at it`s brink,
No longer do men need trees for warmth or cool,
Entertainment is all around, plenty to eat and drink,
Everything seems a click away and men be-fooled,
Only to be entangled in more misery till extinct

Death of a Luminary: Mother Angelica

9 Apr

Mother Angelica, Founder of world`s largest religious broadcasting network EWTN passed away on March 27th 2016. She was 92 years old.29angelica-web1-superJumbo

Birth and Early Life:
Mother Angelica was born April 20, 1923, as Rita Rizzo in an Italian neighborhood in Canton, Ohio. She was the only child of John and Mae Helen Rizzo . Her father, a tailor by trade, abandoned the family when Rizzo was very young and her parents divorced in 1929. Her mother maintained full custody of her but struggled with chronic depression and poverty.

Looking back upon this time in her life, Mother Angelica described herself and her mother as being “like a pair of refugees. We were poor, hungry, and barely surviving on odd jobs before Mother learned the dry cleaning business as an apprentice to a Jewish tailor in our area. Even then, we pinched pennies just to keep food on the table.” By the age of 16, Rizzo realized that her mother’s dry-cleaning job was a dead-end; through Rizzo’s efforts, her mother gained a better job that provided some relief from their dire poverty. “We lived in rat-infested apartments — our life was so hard. I was interested in survival so I didn’t do well in school. It’s hard when you’re hungry and cold to study,” she recalled in 1987.

She spent much of her early life plagued by an array of stomach ailments. In 1943, she claimed to have been cured by a Catholic faith healer, signaling the beginning of her interest in a religious vocation, according to a 2007 biography written by Mr. Arroyo, “Mother Angelica: The Remarkable Story of a Nun, Her Nerve, and a Network of Miracles.”

In 1944, she joined her religious order and professed her solemn vows in Canton in 1953 as Sister Mary Angelica of the Annunciation, of the Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration, a contemplative order of Franciscan nuns in Canton. Another physical ailment — a spinal injury suffered in a fall, followed by two years of chronic pain — led her to promise to build a new monastery if cured. Her prayers answered, she set off in 1962 with four other sisters of her order to start Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Irondale, a place with almost no Catholics.

There, Mother Angelica began writing booklets and recording audio cassettes to introduce Catholicism to her new neighbors. When a local television station gave her a half-hour of airtime, her on-camera charisma attracted Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network, which began airing her show on its satellite network. She said these appearances made her aware of the tremendous influence television has in spreading messages.

In an interview with The New York Times in 1989, Mother Angelica described how a visit to a television studio in Chicago ignited her entrepreneurial drive, and led to the birth of her worldwide enterprise. “I walked in, and it was just a little studio, and I remember standing in the doorway and thinking, it doesn’t take much to reach the masses,” she said. “I just stood there and said to the Lord, ‘Lord, I’ve got to have one of these.’”

With the support of her religious community, Mother Angelica began consulting with media experts about starting her own TV station, hatching the idea of EWTN. She was granted a license by the Federal Communications Commission, and EWTN went on the air in August 1981.She began with $200 and little knowledge about TV production. The operation started in a building meant to be a garage on the grounds of the Our Lady of the Angels Monastery she headed in the Irondale suburb of Birmingham. Originally its daily programming of several hours was carried by three cable systems.

In 1992, Mother Angelica launched the short-wave EWTN Global Catholic Radio which broadcasts in English and Spanish. In 1996, EWTN started a satellite-delivered AM/FM radio network with programming also available for rebroadcast by local stations.

In 1998, Mother Angelica stepped down as the head of EWTN and Deacon Steltemeier was appointed chairman and CEO. He died in 2013.

Awards & Recognition:
In 2009, Pope Benedict XVI awarded the Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice Cross to her and Deacon Bill Steltemeier, then-chairman of EWTN’s board of governors, for distinguished service to the church. The cross, whose name is Latin for “for the church and the pope,” is the highest papal honor that can be conferred on laypeople and clergy.Because of ill-health, Mother Angelica received the award in her private quarters. But in the public ceremony, Bishop Robert J. Baker of Birmingham said “Mother Angelica’s effort has been at the vanguard of the new evangelization and has had a great impact on our world.”

A 1995 profile in Time magazine called her “an improbable superstar of religious broadcasting and arguably the most influential Roman Catholic woman in America.”

Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia, a member of the network’s board of governors, said in its statement that Mother Angelica “succeeded at a task the nation’s bishops themselves couldn’t achieve.”

Mother Angelica’s outspokenness on church issues — her pet peeves were gender-neutral language in the liturgy and a change allowing girls to become altar servers — made her both friends and enemies among the Catholic faithful.

Quotes:
“Faith is having one foot on the ground and the other up in the air, waiting for the Lord to put the ground under it”

“We have lost the theology of risk and replaced it with a theology of assurance” that says “you have to know what’s going to happen before you embark on something new”

To a Little Cat

20 Feb

Full of zeal it jumps around,IMG_1309
Mesmerized by the beautiful butterflies that surround,
The honey bee with it`s colorful hues,
The fallen Areca Nut with wonderful contours

The little pussy cat has just opened its eyes,
Excited by the green nature around it hops and jumps,
It tries to grab everything that`s colorful,
The little flowers to fallen leaves of foliage plentiful

Lionel comes seeing his pussy cat playing,
Equally joyful is he like the cat at gaming,
God of small things, pleasure infinite,
When he to will have fun with pussy finite

He picks a palms twig and holds it up,
The pussy jumps it finally to tiredness it succumbs,
Joy of everyone at home,
The little cat has finally come

Pied Beauty

13 Feb
By Gerald Manley Hopkins
written 1877

Glory be to God for dappled things —
For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow;
For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;
Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings;
Landscape plotted and pieced — fold, fallow, and plough;
And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.

All things counter, original, spare, strange;
Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;
He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:
Praise him.

References: Gerard Manley Hopkins (28 July 1844 – 8 June 1889) was an English poet, Roman Catholic convert, and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets. His experimental explorations in prosody (especially sprung rhythm) and his use of imagery established him as a daring innovator in a period of largely traditional verse.